Saving lives with naloxone: Recommendations for policy and practice

The term ‘take-home naloxone’ refers to a variety of life-saving initiatives in which a medication (naloxone) is made available to non-medically trained people for administration to others experiencing an opioid overdose. Despite a range of efforts to expand these initiatives over the last decade, the uptake of take-home naloxone in Australia remains inconsistent.  This month…

Update: Telehealth for hepatitis C treatment

In early 2021 the Commonwealth Department of Health funded researchers at La Trobe University to conduct a study on telehealth for hepatitis C treatment during COVID-19 Understanding experiences of telehealth care delivery for hepatitis C treatment in Australia. Telehealth has been successful in the treatment of hepatitis C by improving patient access to healthcare, especially…

New handbook chapter: The politics of ‘intoxication’

In 2019 the DruGS team completed work on two large Australian Research Council-funded qualitative projects, one on opioid overdose and take-home naloxone, and the other on performance and image enhancing drugs and hepatitis C. In an invited chapter for the forthcoming Handbook on Intoxicants and Intoxication edited by Tamar Antin, Vibeke Frank and Geoffrey Hunt,…

New articles: How does research treat gender in ‘alcohol-related violence’?

Two new articles, co-authored by DruGS program members David Moore and Duane Duncan, analyse how gender issues are handled in recent Australian research on alcohol and violence. Both articles report findings from an international comparative research project involving colleagues from universities in Australia, Canada and Sweden, and funded by the Australian Research Council. The first…

Now recruiting: Hepatitis C treatment study

This year we began an exciting new project on people’s experiences of hepatitis C, treatment and post-treatment life in this new age in which hepatitis C elimination seems possible. This project will generate new knowledge on impediments to hepatitis C treatment uptake and a publicly accessible website presenting personal experiences of treatment, decision-making about treatment,…

New articles: Stigma and healthcare access for people who consume drugs

In 2019 the DruGS team completed work on a qualitative interview-based research project on stigma, conducted with South Western Sydney Drug Health Services. Two journal articles were written from the project and have now been published. The first article was recently accepted for publication in Sociology of Health and Illness. Entitled ‘Exclusion and hospitality: The…

Webinar: Sex, intimacy and technology during COVID-19

In June DruGS Program Lead Professor Suzanne Fraser took part in a webinar entitled Love from a distance: Sex, intimacy and technology. Hosted by the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University, the webinar explored the role of new technologies in shaping sexuality and intimacy, issues that have been…

Now recruiting: Lived experiences of hepatitis C treatment

Treatment of hepatitis C has been revolutionised in recent years with the introduction of interferon-free direct-acting antiretroviral (DAA) medications. With far fewer side effects and higher success rates than past treatments, hepatitis C elimination has been adopted in Australia and elsewhere as an important public health goal. Reaching all those affected by hepatitis C, informing…

Gender in alcohol research and policy

Members of the DruGS program, in collaboration with colleagues from universities in Australia, Canada and Sweden, are conducting an international comparative study analysing the treatment of gender in research and policy on alcohol and violence. Funded by the Australian Research Council, this project includes interviews with researchers and policy stakeholders about alcohol and violence among…