Telehealth for hepatitis C treatment during COVID-19

On World Hepatitis Day, the DruGS team reflects on preliminary findings from a research project exploring how telehealth has shaped hepatitis treatment during the COVID crisis. Funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health, this qualitative interview-based project aims to understand the benefits, limitations and effects of the use of telehealth for hepatitis C treatment during…

World Hepatitis Day 2021 #HepCantWait

Marked annually on July 28, World Hepatitis Day is one of the World Health Organization’s seven global public health days. In an effort to convey the urgency of the current global goal to eliminate hepatitis C by 2030, the theme of this year’s World Hepatitis Day is Hep Can’t Wait. As the event’s website puts…

Overdose response resources proving popular

One of the outcomes of the DruGS team’s Australian Research Council-funded project on overdose prevention and take-home naloxone is a collection of Overdoselifesavers.org resources, including keyrings with backing cards explaining how to respond to an opioid overdose, and USB drives containing the project’s report and recommendations for future overdose policy and practice. Over the last month or…

Presentation at the South Western Sydney Partnership event

Since 2019 members of the DruGS team have been very busy conducting a series of qualitative projects with South Western Sydney Local Health District Drug Health Services. These projects cover a range of important issues including: stigma in alcohol and other drug service delivery, improving youth outreach and heavy drinking and alcohol-related health issues. Recently,…

Costs of oversimplifying intoxication: Forthcoming handbook chapter

In an invited chapter for the forthcoming Handbook on Intoxicants and Intoxication, DruGS program members David Moore, Duane Duncan and Emily Lenton compare the treatment of intoxication in Australian alcohol policy documents with the accounts generated during in-depth interviews with Australian alcohol policy stakeholders, in particular their reflections on the complex relationship between intoxication and…

Overdose response resources available free: order now

One of the outcomes of the DruGS team’s Australian Research Council-funded project on overdose prevention and take-home naloxone is a collection of Overdoselifesavers.org resources. These are now being distributed for free to services and individuals. As project coordinator Dr Adrian Farrugia explained at the project report launch earlier this year, the team has produced keyrings with…

Saving lives with naloxone: Recommendations for policy and practice

The term ‘take-home naloxone’ refers to a variety of life-saving initiatives in which a medication (naloxone) is made available to non-medically trained people for administration to others experiencing an opioid overdose. Despite a range of efforts to expand these initiatives over the last decade, the uptake of take-home naloxone in Australia remains inconsistent.  This month…

Update: Telehealth for hepatitis C treatment

In early 2021 the Commonwealth Department of Health funded researchers at La Trobe University to conduct a study on telehealth for hepatitis C treatment during COVID-19 Understanding experiences of telehealth care delivery for hepatitis C treatment in Australia. Telehealth has been successful in the treatment of hepatitis C by improving patient access to healthcare, especially…

New handbook chapter: The politics of ‘intoxication’

In 2019 the DruGS team completed work on two large Australian Research Council-funded qualitative projects, one on opioid overdose and take-home naloxone, and the other on performance and image enhancing drugs and hepatitis C. In an invited chapter for the forthcoming Handbook on Intoxicants and Intoxication edited by Tamar Antin, Vibeke Frank and Geoffrey Hunt,…