Overdose response resources proving popular

One of the outcomes of the DruGS team’s Australian Research Council-funded project on overdose prevention and take-home naloxone is a collection of Overdoselifesavers.org resources, including keyrings with backing cards explaining how to respond to an opioid overdose, and USB drives containing the project’s report and recommendations for future overdose policy and practice. Over the last month or…

Overdose response resources available free: order now

One of the outcomes of the DruGS team’s Australian Research Council-funded project on overdose prevention and take-home naloxone is a collection of Overdoselifesavers.org resources. These are now being distributed for free to services and individuals. As project coordinator Dr Adrian Farrugia explained at the project report launch earlier this year, the team has produced keyrings with…

Saving lives with naloxone: Recommendations for policy and practice

The term ‘take-home naloxone’ refers to a variety of life-saving initiatives in which a medication (naloxone) is made available to non-medically trained people for administration to others experiencing an opioid overdose. Despite a range of efforts to expand these initiatives over the last decade, the uptake of take-home naloxone in Australia remains inconsistent.  This month…

New handbook chapter: The politics of ‘intoxication’

In 2019 the DruGS team completed work on two large Australian Research Council-funded qualitative projects, one on opioid overdose and take-home naloxone, and the other on performance and image enhancing drugs and hepatitis C. In an invited chapter for the forthcoming Handbook on Intoxicants and Intoxication edited by Tamar Antin, Vibeke Frank and Geoffrey Hunt,…

People who consume drugs saving lives: Project findings

What is an opioid overdose? How do people manage and respond to them? What is take-home naloxone? What is it like to respond to overdoses with and without naloxone? A ground breaking new website sheds light on the stories of people affected by overdose and explores the different ways people who consume drugs manage overdose.…

Now recruiting: Take-home naloxone study

Many thanks to those who have volunteered to be interviewed for SSAC’s project on ‘take-home’ naloxone in Australia. We have now begun conducting interviews with people who consume opioids in Sydney. Interviews will be conducted by research officer, Dr Jeanne Ellard. If you are interested in taking part the study, please contact research associate Adrian…

Now recruiting: Health professionals

Many thanks to those who have volunteered to be interviewed for SSAC’s project on ‘take-home’ naloxone in Australia. We have now begun interviewing health professionals in New South Wales about their experiences with and knowledge of opioids, overdose and take-home naloxone. We would like to interview: Pharmacotherapy prescribers Pain management specialists General practitioners Pharmacists Participation…

Now recruiting: People with chronic pain

Many thanks to those who have volunteered to be interviewed for SSAC’s project on ‘take-home’ naloxone in Australia. We have now begun recruiting people who consume opioid medications to manage chronic pain living in New South Wales. Interviews will be conducted by Research Assistant, Dr Jeanne Ellard. If you are are interested in taking part,…

New study: Take-home naloxone in Australia

A team of researchers led by SSAC’s Professor Suzanne Fraser will begin work this month on a new project investigating impediments to uptake of ‘take-home’ naloxone in Australia. Entitled ‘Understanding the impediments to uptake and diffusion of take-home naloxone in Australia’, the project is funded by the Australian Research Council, and coordinated by research associate…